Colors of the Wind: The Story of Blind Artist and Champion Runner George Mendoza

National Hispanic Heritage Month is September 15 – October 15. What a great time to celebrate the life and work of Mexican-American painter, George Mendoza.  

Powers, J.L. 2014. Colors of the Wind: The Story of Blind Artist and Champion Runner George Mendoza. Cynthiana, KY: Purple House Press.

As a child, George Mendoza began seeing brilliantly-colored lights, shapes and squiggles, eventually losing most of his sight except his peripheral vision and the ever-present colors.  Unable to play basketball or other do other things he wanted, George took up running. He excelled in the sport and competed twice in the Olympics for the Disabled.  In the back of his mind, however, he’d kept a long-ago word advice from his youth.

One day, a flyer arrived in the mail,
advertising a contest for blind artists.
George remembered the priest, who told him,
“You should paint what you see.”

 

George started to paint,
just like the priest told him to do.

And so began the painting career of George Mendoza.

The text appears in a plain, small font on white pages, accompanied by simple blank ink drawings, often highlighted with colors from Mendoza’s paintings.  Each facing page contains a full-bleed image of one of Mendoza’s paintings.

Biographical information, photos of Mr. Mendoza, and painting titles are included in the book’s back matter.

The joyful, riotous colors of Mendoza’s paintings will certainly appeal to children, as will his story of perseverance and purpose.  Enjoy!

You can see photos from Mendoza’s “Colors of the Wind” exhibit at the Ellen Noel Art Museum here.  The exhibit is listed with the Smithsonian Affiliate Exhibition Exchange.

My copy of the book was provided by the author.

You can see all of my reviews at Shelf-employed.

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