Into the Field Guides for Kids

I’m running behind today, but I guess it’s still Monday.

Today at Wrapped in Foil blog I’m featuring two children’s books in the  Into the Field Guide series.

The Into the Field Guides are lightweight and a perfect size to carry along on a hike. They won’t take up much room in a backpack. The guides feature color photographs and clear, simple descriptions to help youngsters learn to identify common animals, plants, and even rocks. They also include an introduction to some basic scientific concepts and facts. For example, the description of the stick insect explains how it uses camouflage to hide from predators.

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A Walk in the Woods has descriptions of animals, plants, and rocks found in Eastern deciduous forests. For example, the bird section highlights American robins, Northern mockingbirds, chickadees, goldfinches, etc.

 

walk-on-the-beach

A Walk on the Beach helps young readers learn about common animals, plants, rocks, shells, and even debris found on the beach. The bird section includes information about water birds ranging from great blue herons and seagulls, to eagles and ducks.

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These field guides would be perfect to accompany the The Great Backyard Bird Count citizen science event coming up soon.

What is the Great Backyard Bird Count? Basically all people need to do is count the birds they see over 15 minutes during the weekend of the event and then report the numbers on the website. Although it is called “backyard,” people can count anywhere birds are found, including parks, preserves, or fields. There is plenty of information and instructions about getting started at the website. It is a wonderful project for kids to participate in.

Seeing Through Walls

Seeing Through Walls: Superman and the Science of Sight
by Agnieszka Biskup (Author)

Booktalk: Super-sight allows the Man of Steel to see through walls and melt metal with his baby blue eyes. But what makes sight possible? And can anyone or anything in our world do what Superman does with his eyes? Get ready to find out with the help of the Worlds Greatest Hero.

Snippet: Superman’s eyes can see through walls and shoot beams to cut through steel. Although we can only wish for these powers, our eyes do have the amazing ability to see a remarkable range of colors. In fact, most people can see about one million colors. How? It’s a tag-team combo of reflected light and the cones in our eyes.

Nonfiction Monday

It’s Nonfiction Monday!

Copyright © 2017 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.

A Celebration of the Art of Beatrix Potter

Today we are highlighting the art and books of Beatrix Potter with A Celebration of Beatrix Potter: Art and letters by more than 30 of today’s favorite children’s book illustrators.

a-celebration-of-beatrix-potter

Last year, 2016, was the 150th anniversary of Beatrix Potter’s birth. To honor her, thirty-two famous children’s book illustrators produced artwork and stories inspired by Potter’s picture books. The featured illustrators range from Lauren Castillo and Tomie dePaola to Rosemary Wells and Pamela Zagarenski. See Kelly Murphy’s website for one example.

The official word is this book is for readers grades three up. You might be skeptical, but it does have the potential to appeal to a range of ages. Younger children will be probably be captivated by the assortment of illustrations and the excerpts from Potter’s children’s books. Adults will be interested in the accompanying essays by the illustrators, as well as the historical tidbits provided as background for Potter’s books. For example, we learn The Tailor of Gloucester was Beatrix Potter’s favorite and that it was based on a true story. How fun!

A Celebration of Beatrix Potter is a treasure trove to explore, especially for readers interested in art and books. It is valuable as a resource for art and history lessons, and as a reference. But best of all it is a fitting tribute to Beatrix Potter’s genius. Check out a copy today.

Stop by Wrapped in Foil blog for activity suggestions to accompany the book.

(Wow, I had forgotten how much fun it is to review children’s books.)

Radiant Child


Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat
by Javaka Steptoe (Author / Illustrator)

Booktalk: A picture book biography won the Caldecott Award!

Jean-Michael Basquiat and his unique, collage-style paintings rocketed to fame in the 1980s as a cultural phenomenon unlike anything the art world had ever seen. But before that, he was a little boy who saw art everywhere: in poetry books and museums, in games and in the words that we speak, and in the pulsing energy of New York City.

Snippet: Somewhere in Brooklyn, between hearts
that thump, double dutch, and hopscotch
In his house, you can tell that a serious ARTIST dwells
As he sits at a table with pencils scattered everywhere.

Nonfiction Monday

It’s Nonfiction Monday!

Copyright © 2017 Anastasia Suen All Rights Reserved.

Under Earth, Under Sea by Aleksandra Mizielinkska and Daniel Mizielinski

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Under Earth, Under Water by Aleksandra Mizielinkska and Daniel Mizielinski. 112 p. Candlewick Press, October, 2016. 9780763689223. (Review from copy borrowed from library.)

Give your earth science teachers something to delight and amaze their students. This impressively designed, over-sized volume will not sit for long. The authors take the reader on a layer-by-layer tour through the depths of earth and water and it is fascinating!

Full review at Proseandkahn.