Missing Math A Number Mystery

Missing math : a number mystery
Missing math : a number mystery

MATHEMATICS (K-2)
Missing Math: A Number Mystery
by Loreen Leedy
ATOS 2.7 460L

Essential Question: Why are numbers important?

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Unit Summary: Students will examine the essential question, “Why are numbers important?” They will work in groups to locate numbers from five books from an assigned section of the library based on the Dewey Decimal System. The groups will find books holding specified number criteria and will fill out a chart to show the numbers they have located. They will use their numbers in number sentences to show greater and less than statements. Then students will discuss the value of numbers and ways they use numbers every day.

See more of this lesson plan on the Teaching STEM blog.

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Infinity and Me

Infinity and me
Infinity and me

MATHEMATICS (3-5)
Infinity and Me 
by Kate Hosford
ATOS 3.4 AD670L

Essential question: What is infinity?

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 Unit Summary: Students will examine the essential question, “What is infinity?” The students will use a strand of a cooked spaghetti noodle to help them visualize the concept. Each student will fold the strand of spaghetti in half and make a cut to divide it into two equal pieces. They will measure the half and record its length to the nearest one-eighth inch on their data table. Then they will repeat the step, cutting the half into a half and measuring its length until they can no longer measure the strand. They will cut the remaining piece as small as possible until they can no longer make a cut. After observing their data, the students will discuss infinity and state their own idea about the concept of infinity.

See more of this lesson plan on the Teaching STEM blog.

Animals and the Environment

Animals and the environment
Animals and the environment

SCIENCE (K-2)

Animals and the Environment
by Jennifer Boothroyd

ATOS 2.3 380L

Why do animals live in different environments?

Help K-5 students answer this essential question (and meet the Common Core State Standards) with the Teaching STEM lesson plans for this mentor text: Animals in the Environment by Jennifer Boothroyd.

Students will examine the essential question, “Why do animals live in different environments?”

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In small groups, they will read and research information about a specific animal and use the text features from the books to locate facts about their animal and why it lives in a specific environment. Using their combined information, the students will create a diagram or other text feature to illustrate the information they have gathered. They will include at least one animal adaptation that enables it to live in its specific habitat. Students will post their text features and students will move around the room to read them.

See more of this lesson plan on the Teaching STEM blog.

A Very Improbable Story

A very improbable story
A very improbable story

MATHEMATICS (3-5)

A Very Improbable Story

by Edward Einhorn

ATOS 3.2 AD470L

What is probability?

Help K-5 students answer this essential question (and meet the Common Core State Standards) with the Teaching STEM lesson plans for this mentor text: A Very Improbable Story by Edward Einhorn.

Students will examine the essential question, “What is probability?” They will become familiar with probability by making predictions and then testing them. Each student will keep data about the predictions and look for patterns while using a spinner to see which color the arrow will land on. They will use vocabulary related to probability and write a number sentence to show their information.

See more of this lesson plan on the Teaching STEM blog.

How Many Jelly Beans?

How many jelly beans?
How many jelly beans?

MATHEMATICS (K-2) How Many Jelly Beans? by Andrea Menotti GRL J   ATOS 1.5

Help K-5 students answer this essential question (and meet the Common Core State Standards) with the Teaching STEM lesson plans for this mentor text.

Essential Question: What would a million of something look like?

Unit Summary: Students will examine the essential question, “What would a million of something look like?” They will explore numbers of increasing size through the enlarging number of jelly beans pictured in the book. They will color sets of five jelly beans and practice skip counting by five as they complete each row on the graphic organizer.

The Library Activity begins on page 182. The Collaborative Teacher Activity is on page 184.

Extension Activities (sample)

1. Give each student ten jelly beans or ten bite-sized candies. Have them write story problems and the number sentences using subtraction as they eat them.

2. Bring in a package of beans or peas. Ask the students how many beans are in the package. Then give a handful to each person until they are all distributed. Ask them to count their beans and write it down. Then have the students make piles of tens and re-count the beans. Ask which way is easier. Count the beans by 10s for everyone in the class to get the total number of beans. Then take a set amount of beans and write number sentences. You can do this with numbers up to 20 to review addition and subtraction or make larger numbers. Group the students and have them work together with more beans.

3. After reading the book, have the students write a short description of the main idea of the book. Use the phrase, “I am a mathematician. I know that _________.”

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Oceans & Seas

Oceans and Seas

SCIENCE (3–5)

Oceans & Seas

by Margaret Hynes

Lexile Level: NC 1130L (Non-Conforming)

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What allows animals to live in a specific water ecosystem?

Help K-5 students answer this essential question (and meet the Common Core State Standards) with the Teaching STEM lesson plans for this mentor text: Oceans & Seas by Margaret Hynes (Lexile Level: NC 1130L)

Students will examine the essential question, “What allows animals to live in a specific water ecosystem?” Students will be grouped and assigned a specific ecosystem chosen from the suggested list. They will conduct research using a variety of sources to identify important information about an animal that lives in their assigned ecosystem and identify the adaptations the animal has that allows it to successfully live there.

The Library Activity begins on page 40. The Collaborative Teacher Activity is on page 42. Extension Activities (sample)

1. Investigate James Cook and other early ocean explorers. Create a timeline of the early explorations and where they took place from journey’s start to end. Add information about the explorers.

2. Look up cultured pearls and read about the process for creating these pearls. Write a description of how it’s done and the science behind it.

3. Explore the issues facing oceans today. Name the largest issues and assign students to research and present the information in a debate-style setting.

Copyright © 2014 Shirley Duke All Rights Reserved. Site Meter

Enterprise STEM

Enterprise STEM

TECHNOLOGY (3-5) Enterprise STEM by Shirley Duke ATOS 6.5

What recent changes have taken place in technology we use every day? coverimage STEM ABC-Clio

Help K-5 students answer this essential question (and meet the Common Core State Standards) with the Teaching STEM lesson plans for this mentor text: Enterprise STEM by Shirley Duke (ATOS 6.5)

Students will examine the essential question, “What recent changes have taken place in technology we use every day?” They will discuss the kinds of technology they use currently and research information about the history and development of one of those forms. Students will use a list of suggestions to guide their research about the chosen kind of technology. They will then organize their information and use technology to create a class presentation in which the other students will note the important aspects of that technology development and write a question about it.

The Library Activity begins on page 19. The Collaborative Teacher Activity is on page 23. Extension Activities (sample)

1. Have the students read further about the inventor of their technology and write a short summary of that information.

2. Create a visual using information from their own timeline to show the important facts in another way. This can include charts, graphs, diagrams, or pictures presenting the information. Share them with the class.

3. After reading the book, have the students write a short description of the main idea of the book. Use the phrase, “I am a technology specialist. I know that _________.”

Copyright © 2014 Shirley Duke All Rights Reserved. Site Meter